Know Your Trusses: Different Types Of Roof Trusses

Trusses

What is the difference between a gable roof and a gambrel roof? What are trusses and how do they help build roofs? These are all questions that we will answer in this blog post. We’ll also talk about different types of roof trusses for residential and commercial buildings, as well as some of the benefits of using them on your next project.

How Many Types Of Roof Trusses Are There?

There are different types of roof trusses, with the goal to create a sturdy frame that supports your home’s roof. The type you choose will depend on how much weight it has to support and what kind of design is being used for your house. 

What Are Some Examples?

Gable roofs have two trusses along the length of each side wall, while gambrel roofs typically only have one long truss running down the centerline of the building. Gable roofs also don’t require as many bracing members since they’re able to utilize both sides of walls and their sloping angle provides additional stability against lateral forces (wind). However, gamblers provide more headroom in an attic space below because there is no sloping roofline.

Hip Truss

The hip truss is the most common type of roof because it’s a simple design that provides good support and doesn’t have any additional cutting or measuring. Hip-roofs are typically found on ranch style homes, bungalows, and cottages. They’re best suited for roofs with low pitch angles (less than 12 degrees).

Hip Roof Truss – The simplest form of roof frame where two rafters intersect at their hips to provide stability in a side wall. A typical house would have four different parts: “eave” which runs along the bottom edge; “ridge board”, which sits on top of each rafter/truss intersection point; “common rafters” running from eave to ridge; “jack rafters” running perpendicular to the common rafter and acting as support for projecting dormers.

Scissor Roof Truss

Scissor Roof Truss – A type of roof frame where two rafters intersect at their hips to provide stability in a sidewall. It is typically found on one-story homes with low pitch angles (less than 12 degrees).

Hip and Scissor roofs are fairly easy for an amateur to put together, but they can be cost-prohibitive as the quality of material may not be up to par. The Hip and Scissor houses also have less headroom space due to the sloping walls which means that there will only be about six feet between ceilings or upper floor if you decide to add another level in your home’s design plan.

Attic Truss

Attic Truss – A truss that projects from the ridge of a gable roof. It helps distribute weight to the sides and may serve as an attic.

The Attic or double-hip truss is a popular choice for roof framing because it has two hips, which provide more support than other types of roofs such as hip and scissor roofs. The downside with this type of frame is that your home will have low headroom space due to sloping walls which means you’ll only get about six feet between ceilings if you decide to add another level in the design plan for your house’s interior spaces.

Mono Truss

Mono Truss – A truss that projects from the ridge of a gable roof to form one hip. It can be used as an attic, but not for ceilings because it has no ridges.

The mono truss is built with only one slope and this type of frame provides low headroom space which means there’s just about six feet between ceilings if you decide to add another level in your home’s design plan. The upside here though is that this particular frame will let natural light into your house more easily than other types of frames such as the scissor or hip roofs (which do have two slopes).

North Light Roof Truss

North Light Roof Truss – Is similar to the mono truss in that it also has only one slope. However, this type of roof is different because it comes down from a gable or hip roof and then projects parallel to that level for about three feet before meeting up with another ridge. This type of frame includes an attic which can provide greater headroom space than its counterpart because there are two slopes instead of just one.

The north light roofs are built so they let more natural light into the house by running perpendicular on top of the ceiling at right angles and not being limited to just coming straight down like most other frames do (mono-trusses).

Gambrel Truss

A gambrel truss is a roof frame that has an upper chord and lower chord. The design of the two chords are different from other types, making it stand out from most roofs you see in residential homes.

Flat Truss Is Used To Support Roof Construction In Residential Homes.

– There are three different types of trusses: North Light, Mono, and A-Frame.

– The north light style is similar to the monotype in that it has only one slope but they differ because this frame includes an attic which provides more headroom space than its counterpart due to there being two slopes instead of just one.

– This frame also comes from a gable or hip roof and then projects parallel to that level for about three feet before meeting up with another ridgeline.

– It allows natural light into the house by running perpendicular on top of ceilings at right angles rather than coming straight down like most other frames do (mono).

– The top or upper part of this type of chord slopes at a lesser angle than the bottom or lower part due to its unique shape on paper. This results in more headroom space because there’s more room for insulation material between these sections rather than being against one another like with mono roofs which can cause heat loss if not insulated properly.

– This frame also comes from gable or hip roofs before meeting up together as they extend outward parallel to each other forming a V shape similar to what A-frames have.

– There are different styles of trussed roofs, though they all share the same shape and design as other roof types.

– In order to create this type of frame, there is a need for more than just one rafter that runs along with both chords in an angled fashion as seen on most roofs like gable or hip roofs before meeting up together as they extend outward parallel to each other forming a V shape similar to what A-frames have.

– Supporting elements like purlins must be used in order for these rafters to meet at the top left corner where it will form angles which can be covered by panels or shingles later on down the line when construction has been completed.

Trusses may also be categorized by the number of panels they have: single panel, double panel, or triple panel. The more panels a truss has, the less likely it is to deflect when weight is applied because there are more joints that can resist movement and hold up your home’s roof. Triple-panel trusses provide an additional layer of support with their vertical members called purlins which strengthen connections between rafters (horizontal beams) at ceiling height in order to keep them from spreading apart under heavy loads.

The different types of roof trusses will depend on what kind of design you prefer for your house and how much weight it needs to carry. A gambler might not work if you’re planning on installing a second floor.

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